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to keep the government funded through september avoiding a shutdown but keeping in place the sequester. explain to us how the government funding will work thund bill. guest: they are able to continue funding government past the march 37 deadline. it was a very fine line they had to walk. republicans weren't going to sign off on something that redid the cr but there are a number of republicans who were trying to get piece of the sequester reinstated. so as a result they put together a package, a compromise mostly came together in the senate, both side working together that restores some of the funding but fleeves place a lot of the other cuts. air traffic control towers still going to see problems. other places fur lowses will still happen. meat inspec tors spared the action a little bit. we are all making a bill big deal about the budget this week because in regular order there is a budget, there are appropriation bills and this is how government functions. in the last few years they haven't done that. without it government would have shut down. host: we are talking with ginger gibson.
. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to
the government fears contagion. it starts doing naughty things. this is limiting how much those folks can take out once they can get out the money. it is enacting sweeping measures that are raising eyebrows worldwide. banks rethinking even being there. paying customers wanting to get out of there. it is a mess. in these next 72 hours, cyprus officials are very lelia. they are working overtime to contain this mess. let me put it this way. cyprus is no longer an island. cyprus is a tsunami. it scares me customers worldwide. that is what they are hoping to avoid this weekend. it depends on whether they deal with this. going to john brown, and our own nicole petallides on whether they can and will. nicole kno of what she speaks. her parents are from cyprus and she has visited there many times or so. these are wholly times. >> i am so glad that you're painting it in the proper way. this is .2% of europe's gdp. it is a small island and it is being menial to so many. but it paints a picture of what is going on there. which is catastrophic. you go in there and you are talking about confiscating peles
the government is looking out for them people, they have health care coverage for it insurance companies know when they go to the system, they are out of business. i will be glad when we go to a so allpayer system americans will be covered without having to spend their entire welfare covering medical bills. i can't believe americans are so stupid. host: eleanor on our line for dependents. -- independents. caller: it seems like the republicans want to stand up for big business. at least now when the affordable care act, the insurance companies have to pay a larger portion towards patient care, i think that is the report that problem republican have with it. , our line for democrats. are you there? caller: yes. i don't think that what they are doing to obama after they put , inin the chair that we florida, as older people, as you call it, done it worked and paid into it, we need the health thing. i have been on its in putting sinced i have seen -- 1988. i have seen it three or four times change. why do they put any president in and they keep changing it? now, they put obama in their -- there. ,
responsibility, limited government, and free markets. because of the tea party, we were able to put candidates like michele bachmann into congress so they can make sure that congress will not continue to spend my generation's money. we need to save the tea party so that we can save america. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome a representative for the tea party patriots. ♪ coming up ♪ >> thank you. picture this. college students who are optimistic about this future and look forward to living the american dream. they becomege, parents and put food on the table for their children, save for their retirement, and still have money left for leisure activities and vacations. become senior citizens, they know their retirement is a secure, backed by a strong, a sound dollar. needs are metare with the best quality health care on the planet, and they are at peace, knowing their life's accomplishments will be passed on to their children and grandchildren. imagine. our country, the most charitable country on earth. and those who are not able to take care of themselves, are uninsured, or hit hard times
was crossed. at thisote without point having all the facts there me, that we know syrian government has the capacity to carry out chemical weapon attacks. inknow that there are those the syrian government who have expressed a willingness to use chemical weapons, if necessary, to protect themselves. of anyeply skeptical claim that, in fact, it was the opposition that use chemical weapons. everybody who knows the facts of chemical weapons stockpile inside syria as well as the syrian government could abilities, i think would question those claims. i know they are floating out there right now. point is, once we establish the facts, i have made clear the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. host: in the newspaper this morning, and israel -- this is from a cnn interview -- host: i want to get your reaction and your thoughts on u.s. policy towards syria. the numbers are on your screen -- host: you can also post a comment on facebook or send a twitter. you can send an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. the washington post, obama warns syria on chemical arms -- host: the british-based syrian obse
governors in jail, it's one of the most corrupt governments not just in the country -- time magazine rated the most corrupt goth -- governments in the world. number one was venezuela, number two was north korea, number three was illinois. [laughter] now, illinois' really bad, but if i take a drive about an hour and a half north on i-94, i start to get a smile on my face, and i pass into the dairy state. [cheers and applause] i get a smile because i know i'm in a state that has a leader. a state that has a leader that stood up to special interests, that looked the unions in the eye and made reforms that were not really popular at the time but are now proven effective. conservatives across the country could look to the governor of wisconsin as a model that you could be courageous, be called out, go to a recall and win with more votes than you did the last time. [cheers and applause] as a student, we need more leaders like scott walker. and as conservatives, we need to promote people like scott walker to run for office and encourage them to continue. ladies and gentlemen, i am honored to intr
's consider working together on areas to change how the government does business and give more value to the taxpayer while we get spending under control. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from georgia, mr. arrow, for five minutes. mr. barrow: mr. speaker, i rise today to urge my colleagues to join me in support of house joint resolution 33 which would reshape the way washington operates. because congress has failed to do its job to find the spending cuts we need to replace the sequester, folks all across this country, including folks in my district in georgia, will pay the price. unfortunately in washington there are rules that prevent members of congress from being penalized for not doing their jobs. the constitution doesn't protect the folks at home so why should it protect the pay of members of congress? the 27th amendment of the constitution was written to prevent members of congress from giving themselves pay increases, but lately it's been used as a shield to prevent a congressional pay cut. my proposal, house joint resolutio
on the pump. we also realize between the state and federal government a lot of us are paying 40-plus cents a gallon to build the road that we're wearing out with the gas we put in. that's a user's fee. when i came here and break this down and asked the question, of tax/user rth of gas fee, 18.3 cents a gallon, $1 of that, how much of that actually goes into roads and bridges? and i'll tell you it adds up like this -- then we reduce it a little bit on this number. three cents out of that dollar went for trails for bike trails, snowmobile trails and that sort of thing. 3%. there was a one time $16 million in one of our appropriation bills to do -- to clean graffiti off of the walls, retaining walls in new jersey. and i thought, can't they get their prisoners out there with a wire brush to do that? and 28% going for environmental arciological -- interest, looking for arrowheads and endangered species. can't somebody pay for that rather than the people driving on the roads? when you add davis-bacon to that, another 20%, 22%, so you have 3% for trails, you have 28% for our achepologicl and env
in the world. that is what the government set out to achieve. that's what is what we're dr delivering. they did a survey that ranks the most competitive tax regime in the world. three years ago we were near the bottom of the table. now we're at the top. in the global rate, we cannot stand still. today we step up the pace, our enterprise investment team offering generous -- they have done a great job help progress mote it around the country. they asked me to extend the holiday,ly i will. we're make our new employee shareholders more generous with income tax relief and increasing -- of business to the employees. company that look after employees and help them return to work will get new help through the tax system too. and we're going trouble to 120,000 pounds the size of the loans that employers can get for tax free to say for season ticketers for commuters. it's a great idea for the honorable friend and i'm happy to put in practice. my honorable friend and others, have put forward proposals to help investment in social -- enterprises. i listened and we will release a new tax to encourage privat
. cruze says his dad made it on his own without government assistance. he worked hard and provide for his family and now his son has achieved the american dream. that's the way this country is supposed to work. but president obama himself has a very compelling story to tell. his father abandoned him. he was raised primarily by his maternal grandparents in hawaii. he had few resources. yet, barack obama rose up to become the most powerful man in the world, a stunning achievement. how much the system helped mr. obama is unknown as his college records have been kept private. we don't know the extent of affirmative action. we don't know how much the government subsidized his climb to the top. it would be very helpful to have that information simply to be fair to the president and his vision there is no president obama believes his discuss is is due to government that goes to the famous line "you didn't build that." so the battle lines are now drawn between senator cruise who believes in the free market and small government and president obama who wants the government partially regulate the ec
personal freedom, smaller and more effective government are the only pretzels that can offer our children the measure of their potential in american centuries. i meant to tell you there is no us or them. the face of the republican party needs to be the face of every american. we need to be the party of inclusion and acceptance. [applause] ours our heritage, and future, and we need to cancel our efforts in those terms. as republicans, we need to be re-acquainted with the idea that relationships that really matter are not made through twitter, or social media, real relationships take time to grow. they begin with a genuine interest in the stories, the hopes, the dreams, any challenges harvard within each of us. when i ran for governor in 1998, a woman-- a complete stranger to me, stood up a town hall meeting and challenge me to help children like hers. i'm sure i said something pleasant in response. it wasn't good enough for murphy. she would not let me up for air. over the next month, i traveled and talked to parents who fear nothing more than having their disabled child outlive them and b
do not know of a family, i do not know of other units of government that as they're trying to wrestle with this question confine themselves to only looking at one side of the balance sheet. but that's what the house budget does. you know, i was thinking about this approach and this question about deficits not long ago, and it struck me that when i look at myself in a mirror, madam president, i always wish that i was thinner. i always wish i was thinner. but i've never once looked in a mirror and wished i was weaker. an all-cuts approach is like looking in a mirror and wishing your weaker because an all-cuts approach placks yo makes you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing re
putting members on the government payroll. little traction has gained despite high-profile controversies. as i mentioned earlier, a saide ago, jesse jackson kim my wife's company work for the campaign? opinion was that yes, she can, unless -- as long as certain things are met. we know jesse jackson pled guilty to misusing thousands of dollars in campaign funds for personal use. he clearly lost -- crossed the line. i think people are starting to think, maybe we should once again revisit what is happening, where is the line was -- with personal use? a few years earlier, there was a lot of scrutiny when the california sensitive -- , his wife'sve company was getting a 50% commission for his campaign. .- 15% commission people got caught up in the larger investigation into the lobbying scandal. he was never formally charged with wrongdoing, but that was an episode where people said earning commissions, is that appropriate? ?ost: what was the end result guest: nothing has changed. it is still legal. the whole compensation system is determined by the member of congress and his employees. or her
$7100. that's for an individual. for a family of four, the cheapest insurance that the government's going to allow you to buy is going to be over $20,000. now, you compare it to what the premiums are now for individuals, it's about $5,000 for an individual, that's the average price of private insurance, so you can just see an average of a little bit over 5,000 to over 7,000, and for a family of four the average right now is a little bit over $14,000. so that'll go up to 20,000. that's just going to happen with these exchanges when they get set up next year. of -- now, so that's the cost of insurance. but you were supposed to pay a fee or fine if you didn't have insurance. for somebody that makes about 50,000, that fine would be about 1600. if you make $100,000, it'd be over $2,000. but the thing is you really won't even have to pay that, even though that's already quite a bit less than the insurance would cost you. and the reason is because in the obamacare bill it's set up so that the irs, basically, will find it impossible to collect the money from anybody. you know, the irs, it
of lehman brothers, the fourth-largest investment bank in the world. >> isn't the government supposed to protect the investors? >> yes. >> aren't they charged with informing investors? >> yes. >> why didn't they do it? >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm bob simon. even though fraud played a significant role in the 2008 meltdown of the american economy, as of late 2012, there have been several civil suits filed against major wall street financial firms, but not a single criminal prosecution. in this edition, we look back at the 2008 financial crisis and the failure of government regulators to prosecute those who might be criminally responsible. later, lehman brothers bankruptcy investigator anton valukas shares his findings on the collapse of the giant investment bank where no senior official has ever faced charges in the biggest bankruptcy in u.s. history. but first we begin with a nine-month 60 minutes investigation looking for wall street cases that might have prosecutorial merit. in december 2011, steve kroft reported on two such cases. we begin with a woman named eileen foster,
are sort of the first step to the government coming into your house and trying to take away your guns. so that, i think, has been the, you know, the strength of their appeal. much more so than dollars and cents. they're part of the culture in parts of the country. >> we put that poll up, and we saw support for some level of gun control go up after newtown. now it seems to be slipping back a little bit more. i think karen has a great point, rana. it really is that slippery slope argument. >> it is. listen, i grew up in rural indiana. i understand parts of the country have different attitudes about guns. again, i think we've really gotten a twisted view of what the american norm is. if you go back to the 19th century or the earlier part of the 20th century, gun control laws were much stricter, even in free-wheeling -- or places perceived as being free wheeling like texas, colorado, western states. i think that our sense of normal has just moved so far away from what a middle point is that we need to get back there. >> rana, karen, thanks to both of you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >>> also
and grows the government even bigger. and i agree with the "washington post" -- that said that the democrat budget is not a viable plan. it's not a responsible account of the really the magnitude of the mess that we're in financially and what we need to be facing. so i think it's one of the reasons that you do see 400 amendments. the big amendments that came out and voted for last night was the one to repeal part of the health care law. the part that deals with the specific tax on medical devices. 79 members of the senate voted in favor of it. including 34 democrats. and none of them were breaking ranks before the president was re-elected. now you're hearing more and more complaints about the health care law. >> senator, i want to ask you, you use the phrase, the senate budget not being a viable plan. >> that was the "washington post's" assessment of it. >> the same criticism has been labeled to the paul ryan budget, which uses as part of its calculation, defunding broadly, president obama's health care law. which i think, i think we probably can agree, is not likely to happen. if both side
, let's get to governing, what we do is go in for the kill. because in a knife fight between a liberal and a conservative a conservative will stab ya and then they'll step on the wound, and break your neck and then put you in the trunk next to the other bodies -- >> hal: and a liberal will say here is my knife. >> right. >> hal: on that note we will let you go. karl frisch, karl frisch.com some fantastic stuff. not the least of which is on your sight, karlfrisch.com. you have a -- >> youth in government it changed my life. >> hal: so not only is karl frisch's site great in and of it's a, but also if you got a moment, and -- and you are leaning that way at all, you know, go by there, click on the link and donate. >> and he tends to be super funny. >> i try to be. >> there is no try, karl. there just is. >> hal: thank you yoda jacki. thank you karl frisch for leaving us on a yoda laugh. >> take chair. >> hal: we're going to talk about the president's trip to israel. and the difficult issues of the middle east peace process, dealing with the israeli palestinians and
how government raises and spends money. >> wow. >> just 19% support the way congressional republicans are dealing with it. and it was nearly split. 47% sided with the president, 46% sided with republicans, and i wonder, joe, if this is at least inspiration enough for them to just get a deal. is anyone going to get worse than this? really? why can't they at least get something done. >>> i think politically the pressure is more on the president for this reason. you go -- you ask somebody -- it's kind of like lawyers. i found that everybody hated lawyers, right? >> yep. everybody loves their own lawyer. you should have seen what she did in court. man, let me give you my lawyer's number. it's the same thing with congressmen. everybody hates congressmen, but hey, my guy, my woman, they go up there and boy they fight. so, again, you've got to put yourself in the position of a congressman looking at 31% approval rating going, yeah, that's fine. i'm saying that 74%, the words of dire straits, you know, i got a daytime job, i'm doing all right. i think the pressure when you look at these numbe
, a new report for the government. and absolutely slams freddy mack. why? >> troubling reports concerning freddie mac, inspector general of the federal housing finance agency, saying they aren't doing such a good job of working out complaints from homeowners. they found that freddie's eight biggest servicers resolved more than 25,000 complaints. that sounds great, but they failed to take care of more than 20% of them in the required 30-day window. that's even after they moved the case up the chain of command. a huge problem, when it comes to serious complaints like servicing fraud and improper foreclosures, what it means, people could potentially lose their homes while these services are twiddling their thumbs on cases. the report it found that four of freddie servicers never reported any cases in this period, even though they handled more than 20,000 of them, so this watchdog agency put out recommendations. we'll see if those recommendations go anywhere. carol. >> alison kosik live from the new york stock exchange. >>> a little politics/entertainment. a fresh dose of sarah palin when she
of the party right now is that it is anti-tax and once big cuts in the size of government. and that has not changed. and through the whole budget wars we've been seeing, the sequester, i think this came up the last time i was here. the economic conservatives, the low tax, small government conservatives have established their supremacy. they have beaten out the national security hawks who didn't want to see cuts to defense. i think this is an example where they're beating the social conservatives who aren't ready for a shift in gay marriage. opposition within the party to gay marriage is substantial and they don't want a more liberalized immigration policy. so the one thing that is still here is low taxes, including on the wealthy, and deep cuts to government. i think that is a fundamental problem for the party. it cause them problems with all kinds of groups. there is only so much you can do when you change the language as long as you hold on to the tax and spending cuts policies. >> you touched on immigration policy. i think lawmakers in washington on the republican side see it as esse
. >>> will the federal government begin stealing our money? yes! this late it's economic theory not of taxation, but outright theft was being discussed, but the cypriot government tried to introduce a new tax. though it was soundly rejected by the parliament, this didn't stop one particular television network from implying it might someday be proposed here in the united states. this nonsensical nothing was then followed by the asking of a question that appeared to come out of the nowhere. >> a research in killing jesus, do you know why jesus was killed? by the romans? >> that question has been considered by some of the finest theological minds in history. and it will be expounded from pull pits around the nation as we approach easter sunday. but all of them have clearly missed the point, according to mr. o'reilly. >> you don't know and shouldn't know, because it was about taxes. >> you don't know and you shouldn't know, because it was about taxes. now, as anyone with a modicum of biblical history will tell you, the death of christ was an act of substitutionary atonement. he neither lived nor di
's a holiday here on monday. that would give the government five more days to either get money out of russia or come up with some other way to solve the math here. remember when the end game is. this country asked for 17 billion euros from other european countries and they said we're not going to give you that much. we'll only give you 10 billion euros. we'll help you out with recapitalizing the banks but you guys have to come up with nearly 6 billion on your own and really the only place to get it is in deposits. we saw the parliament reject that last night. here's the one piece of insight that i can give you since being on the ground here. overseas everyone was aghast that would try to tax insured deposits. the vast majority of the cypriots we talk to are aghast at the concept of taxing any deposits even the wealthy. they see it as an attack on the business model of the country. and they don't want that to happen. where do you come up with the money is the question? guys, back to you. >> so many different angles as we go on. they'll take an american credit card. you're using credit cards a
living in a prison-like state governed at every step of their life by the east german government. >> tom did not have a prompter. tom did not have a script. he just had the entire history of the 20th century in his head. and it all came out that night. >> sometime after midnight at the berlin wall one of our computer technicians ed lee came running up wide-eyed and he handed me a big chunk of the berlin wall. and he said they were taking it down right before our eyes. so i keep a small kind of iconic piece of it on my desk constantly. i think it represents the shattering of the divisions between people and the collapse of the soviet union and communism as a political philosophy. you can build a wall, but the people will take it down. ♪ new day for the catholic church, and new questions about the church's influence on american politics. we have perspective this morning on the journey ahead for pope francis, from cardinal francis george, the archbishop of chicago. what message did the cardinals mean to send with the selection of the first ever pope from latin america? a special discussio
the reported 10 billion euros. he said the number has been exaggerated by the communist government, the former communist government. the officials are saying the imf nor the ecb has independently verified this figure. tyler, i have a call in to the imf. i'm awaiting their response. >>> 40% of the deposits in the cyprus banks belong to foreigners. many of whom are russian investors. robert frank here with the fallout on this. i guess it's easier for the cyprus officials to say let me take the money out rather than lay the whole cost of this bailout on cyprus' taxpayers. >> but the way they did it is surprising. cyprus is not just a tax haven for russia, it is the tax haven for russian millionaires and billionaires. russia has invested $119 billion, that's with a "brks" in cyprus in 2011 alone. that's by far the largest recipient of russian investments in the world. equal amount of investment came back to russia from cyprus. funny how that works. russian investment is five times the total economic output for cyprus. russians account for $20 billion of total bank deposits or, tyler, as you mentio
this will be perceived and that's something that our executives, and whether they're in the regular federal government or the postal service, has to take note of. that the public is watching and that they are turned off by seeing waste of taxpayer dollars or in this case, sosh service dollars. >> attendees see it another way. >> relationships and networking very important. if they just stand in their office in washington they wouldn't get the feel of what the mailers want and need in the industry because the industry's changing. technology is changing and the postal service is changing with it. >> reporter: again, the u.s. postal service spending more than 2 million dollars on exhibit space and travel expenses. that may not sound like a lot, but as one government watch dog group told me, the way you end up 16 billion dollars in debt you don't worry about a 2 million dollar expenditure. over time, harris, it all adds up. >> harris: indeed it does. thank you. and republican lawmakers stepping up calls to hear from the the survivors of the benghazi terror attacks, six months after that assault there are
they discussed, but there are lots of things on the plate of the new pope who has to deal with governance within the vatican, its finances, all the challenges facing the church. it was a historic first. it's never been seen before that two popes both dressed in white, prayed together, ate together and spent quality time together. >> oh my goodness, so what maybe next for pope benedict? or not pope benedict, for pope francis. >> reporter: the pope emeritus, looking at the pictures, he looks quite frail. he said he wants to be hidden from the world. we understand that some time within the next month, he'll be moving to a converted monastery on the grounds of the vatican, but he's a studious man. he's not interested in having an active public life. he's made that quite clear. so our understanding is it will be sort of a life of contemplation, study and writing in the back gardens of the vatican. not a bad place to spend your retirement. >> not bad at all. ben wedeman, thanks so much from rome. >>> earlier today the u.s. senate passed its version of the federal budget. it's mostly symbolic since it
representatives of the black community. the community had to govern in our own interest and we will take that honor make that happen. the idea was not just about standing up to the police. it never was from the beginning. the party was very much about creating stewardship and self governance and community self-governance. while the initial development of the party and the national threat was there the strategy of self-defense, a lot of what became really the center of a party practice in 69 and onward was free brac is for children and community programs about taking care the community. here you had the war on poverty and yet you had children starving here in the united states. the black panther party said we are going to feed the children in our community. this was the breakfast program and they had liberation -- i want to say a word about the party. the party was attacked by the federal government not only is an organization that's really the history and the political possibility of the party was attacked. if you look at the documents of j. edgar hoover thinking about the threat of the
the economy get families back on their feet. in the long run that will help the government generate revenue. >> john: american winter director and produceer joe gantz. the film debuts tonight on hbo. thank you for coming on the program. >> i appreciate. >> john: many may have had a come to jesus moment on the debt. after all, and this kind of makes us wonder if the past three years of artificial fiscal crises triggered by the house was anything more than placating contributers. but don't expect our g.o.p. toss change their views on social insurance any time soon. republicans should soon be on record again as supporting severe cuts in programs that benefits the mill class and the poor. i'm delighted to be joined by the reverend dr. susan thistlethwaite professor of theology and former president of the chicago theological seminary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you were the author of "occupy the bible: what jesus really said and did about money and power." >> thank you. >> john: the raptured budget that was on the occupy bible website. what did you mean by calling it a raptors budget. >> you may
the high cost of government. >> i don't understand all the commotion about jones, especially if they are used by law enforcement. you mentioned that people think you are crazy if you are for jones. but what about the privacy base? think about it. police five helicopters over your house now. they have cameras. do you have a problem with that? they are useful and valuable as a law enforcement tool they can help look for lost people and bad guys and their quick on their response. the fuel and maintenance costs is lower than the cost of a helicopter. as a pilot, i want them flown on the under the watchful eye of the faa. but let's help law enforcement do a better job of keeping our neighborhoods safe. melissa: thank you, tom. be sure to catch it at seven and 10:00 p.m. on saturday and sunday, the tom sullivan show. i will be a guest this weekend. happy friday and thank you for joining us. have a great weekend. >> welcome, i am shibani joshi and four gerri willis. we will tackle the new blackberry. as i don't have anything to worry about? we will discover and talk about that as we
's a vision of the country where the government is indifferent to the suffering of many while only paying attention to the demands of a few. then there is the other plan that is before us, the democratic plan. with a balanced set of priorities, a better vision for the future, found in the budget offered by house budget committee ranking member chris van hollen. it takes a balanced approach with targeted spending and new revenues. it would cut waste, add jobs and spur economic growth of the economy. it would reduce the deficit by an additional $1.8 trillion without jeopardizing the recovery or harming the middle class. it includes $1.2 trillion in new revenue obtained not by tax increases but by closing loopholes and eliminating wasteful spending that benefits the wealthiest americans and the largest corporations. it eliminates $4 billion in annual tax breaks to the oil and gas industry, an industry that is making profits. they don't need a tax break. in fact, they're making enormous profits. so, why does the ryan budget give them a government subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infras
to go. they want a yes or a no. charles: we have already scene when you have these giant governments, these welfare mentalities, it will cost the average person. we saw it in california. the bottom for everyone to understand is when you have these giant governments, it will cost everyone. that is a true story. it has already happened here. stuart: up until now, if you lend money to a government or a bank with a bond issue-- now cyprus is introducing something different. everybody pays for the bailout that is the difference here. that is the switch that cyprus brings to us. we are now out of time. the dow is up 14. it is a state of flux. let me give it to you, dagen and connell. dagen: wing all or some of your money, i think most people would choose some. connell: thank you, stuart. good morning, everybody. i am connell mcshane. dagen: i am dagen mcdowell. how you can profit. that is straightahead. connell: bracing for a retirement crisis. will lose share problem is a share problem. we are talking about lulu lemon. that stock is lower and it is all because of some see through yoga pan
's going to give the government, they hope, time to recapitalize the bank. that's a long-winded way to say pitch the bank. put a lot more money in them so they are stronger. not until tuesday because it happens to be a holiday. >> michelle, this is suzie. what do you think could happen on tuesday? there's been so much pent-up anxiety, what happens when those banks open? >> well, it all depends on what happens over the next four days. so cyprus rejeblcted the first idea and they try to raid a pension fund to come up with money to meet the requirements of the bail out from the european partners. now that all of those things have happened, they face two choices. they need to shut down some banks that are very, very weak. or they're going to have to leave the euro. that's the choice they face. and depending on which one they make, that's what's going to happen on tuesday. >> michelle, how did the banks in cyprus get so bloody. is it really traceable basically to the fact that it's a kind of "don't ask, don't tell" kind of banking culture. >> well, certainly, this is a place that advertised dis
'll do is try to extend the banking holiday through the weekend. that's going to give the government, they hope, time to recapitalize the bank. that's a long-winded way to say pitch the bank. put a lot more money in them so they are stronger. not until tuesday because it happens to be a holiday. >> michelle, this is suzie. what do you think could happen on tuesday? there's been so much pent-up anxiety, what happens when those banks open? >> well, it all depends on what happens over the next four days. so cyprus rejeblcted the first idea and they try to raid a pension fund to come up with money to meet the requirements of the bail out from the european partners. now that all of those things have happened, they face two choices. they need to shut down some banks that are very, very weak. or they're going to have to leave the euro. that's the choice they face. and depending on which one they make, that's what's going to happen on tuesday. >> michelle, how did the banks in cyprus get so bloody. is it really traceable basically to the fact that it's a kind of "don't ask, don't tell" kind
the government, they hope, time to recapitalize the bank. that's a long-winded way to say pitch the bank. put a lot more money in them so they are stronger. not until tuesday because it happens to be a holiday. >> michelle, this is suzie. what do you think could happen on tuesday? there's been so much pent-up anxiety, what happens when those banks open? >> well, it all depends on what happens over the next four days. so cyprus rejeblcted the first idea and they try to raid a pension fund to come up with money to meet the requirements of the bail out from the european partners. now that all of those things have happened, they face two choices. they need to shut down some banks that are very, very weak. or they're going to have to leave the euro. that's the choice they face. and depending on which one they make, that's what's going to happen on tuesday. >> michelle, how did the banks in cyprus get so bloody. is it really traceable basically to the fact that it's a kind of "don't ask, don't tell" kind of banking culture. >> well, certainly, this is a place that advertised discretion and what the
a solidarity fund that would pool state assets and give government powers to impose capital controls on banks. the european central banks says cyprus has until monday to raise $7.5 billion or risk financial collapse. banks there have been closed all week and hundreds of demonstrators gathering outside of parliament protesting. it is coming down to the wire. what will this do to the markets. what should you do with your portfolio? with me now is our money power panel. senior fellow at peterson institute. lance roberts, ceo and chief economist with street advisors. pleasure having you there. we're trying to get our third guest all strapped up. i think that was spencer patton. we'll see if we have him in a bit. jacob, let me start wit you. what do you thk of these latest developments? >> well, i think they're fairly prectable actually. it is very clear that the european central bank has given cyprus an ultimatum. it basically put as gun to your head. unless you come up with a deal that qualifies you for an international financial bailout by monday we're going to blow up your banks. unsurprisingl
with you with the analogy. thanks so much. >> thank you so much. >> markets in the red as cypress governs pushing the vote on a bailout by another day, and the next guest says it's no agree. this is an isolated incident in a country so small with a very small limited economic output it went have an impact. joining us now is paul, president of heritage capital, and, paul, great to have you on the program. i know you heard phil's report on how the commodities markets react, and, yesterday, it seemed like investors were nervous, then calm, and, perhaps today they are nervous because maybe it's not just an isolated incident. maybe there will be a ripple effect more than anticipated. is it time? can you put it in the rearview mirror? >> we heard from the -- the last couple years, whatever it takes, they save the euro. whatever it takes. they are not going to have to load a revolver to save cypress, if they even want to. i think cypress is a one often. there's a lot of air in the markets. up roughly 10% on the year in equity, so, of course, any possible reason to pull some profits off the table
got that one wrong as well saying it was a responsibility. that it's not the government that should be in your lives making sure there is shelter over your head, making sure you have food on the table, medicine to keep you well and health care essentially. she says this is the american dream that i believe in. that's what i've been trying to teach my kids and this test is going against it. >>brian: it was on facebook and now has become a huge story. an update on that fox news alert. a shooting in quantico, virginia, where a suspected shooter killed two marines and then killed himself. sherry ly joins us live with the details. when did this happen? >> this happened at 11:00 last night at the officer candidate school. we're told that the gunman and the two victims were all active-duty marines. it started at that officer candidate school. one person was shot dead. according to a base spokesman at quantico, the gunman headed to a barracks, barricaded himself inside. military police as well as law enforcement were called in. a special reaction team went into the barracks where they found
that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, malaysia. so it is not so much a risk on/risk off. if i can jump off an earlier point which is fantastic which is the expansion we see the fundamentals have not changed a lot. that allows us to be a little more flat until the end of the year. sentiment is a very powerful thing. sentiment as momentum picks up people become more confident and like stocks that can be rather strong. we are looking at that right now. so bonds are being sold to finance equities that would change the dynamic and we have to revisit our estimates. >> thanks so much. >> thank you. >>> and coming up we will get more specific and find out which stocks this week's market monitor likes. >>> more warnings that investors should get out of bonds. billionaire investor says i
profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, malaysia. so it is not so much a risk on/risk off. if i can jump off an earlier point which is fantastic which is the expansion we see the fundamentals have not changed a lot. that allows us to be a little more flat until the end of the year. sentiment is a very powerful thing. sentiment as momentum picks up people become more confident and like stocks that can be rather strong. we are looking at that right now. so bonds are being sold to finance equities that would change the dynamic and we have to revisit our estimates. >> thanks so much. >> thank you. >>> and coming up we will get more specific and find out which stocks this week's market monitor likes. >>> more warnings
in teaching. ie. kill gun. the government rebound sight quickly removed it replacing it about this, sorry there is no quote of the day but if you look at it says sorry there is no quote the of the day. >> i bond fer they wrote that quickly. that is how i live my life. there is no quote of the day. a department it of ed spokesman acknowledged the error saying this feature which automatically generates one education related quote per day from a database of quotes last updated in 2007 has been temporarily suspended. i guess because since 2007 they didn't know that that was a murderer didn't know that. >> suspended pending a review of the database content. i believe we have tape of what happened next to the error prone database. that is what he did to his people, america. bernie, this could only happen in the obama administration. >> is absolutely right. speaking of money, you you know, it is not that incongruous because they are paying for the department of education among other things. >> we owe them everything. >> absolutely right. quote away. i mean he killed his own people. he didn't kil
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